Stamnshella


Click for larger image

The village of Stamnshella, at the mouth of the Bolstadfjorden, has been a church site since the early 14th century. Today the village lies on highway 569, connecting Bergen to the island of Osteroy via bridges over the Bolstadfjorden and the Veafjorden. We’d driven along a portion of the Bolstadfjorden on our 2018 day trip from Bergen to Hardangerfjord, and this time explored the beautiful waterway by tender while anchored off Stamnshella.

En route we passed several elaborate fishing platforms, stopped to look at a log transport cableway and took in the the triple waterfall from the river Tysso. On what ended up being a 61-nm tender trip, we then headed north under the Kallestadsundet Bridge to Osteroy and into the waterways north of the island. In Eidsfjorden we viewed the spectacular 300-ft (90m) twin waterfall Hesjedalsfossen, pictured above, and in Romarheimsfjorden we passed through the dramatic gorge at the Mostraumen narrows and had a picnic lunch at the head of Mojfjorden in Mo with waterfalls on either side.

Below are highlights from Sept 17th, 2020. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

Click for larger image
Cliffs
Passing 2,000-ft (630m) cliffs along the east side of the island of Osteroy.
Click for larger image
Veafjorden
Travelling through beautiful Veafjorden along the east side of the island of Osteroy. Norway has no shortage of spectacular scenery.
Click for larger image
Fyletjorna
Waterfall from the river Fyletjorna flowing into the east side of Veafjorden.
Click for larger image
Stamnshella
Anchored off the village of Stamnshella for a tender tour of the area.
Click for larger image
Pedestrian Bridge
Pedestrian bridge over the north end of Bolstadstraumen. With Dirona‘s 9.1m air draft, we could just pass under the the 10m-high span, but it looks awfully tight.
Click for larger image
Bolstadstraumen Bridge
The Bolstadstraumen bridge was completed in 1963, replacing a shuttle boat. Although it looks higher than the pedestrian bridge, the clearance is only 7m, so this is as far as Dirona could go.
Click for larger image
Fishing Platform
One of several elaborate fishing platforms along the Bolstadstraumen. We’re told fishing here isn’t allowed, but these platforms are grandfathered in and owned by “clubs” whose members are allowed to fish from them.
Click for larger image
Firewood
Large firewood supply below a house at Fornes. We see such caches frequently on our tours of more remote areas in Norway.
Click for larger image
Cableway
A cableway heading up a steep slope, used to transport firewood back down.
Click for larger image
River Tysso
Triple waterfalls where the river Tysso empties into Bolstadfjorden. The falls are visible briefly from the E16 highway at the eastern entrance to the Trollkone Tunnel.
Click for larger image
Bolstad
Playing in the current from the river Bolstadelvi at the head of Bolstadfjorden. This was as far as we could proceed in our tender tour. The area around the town of Bolstad here has been settled since at least 500 BC and has long been an important junction for traffic in the region. From 1868 until 1915 a steamship operated between Bolstand and Bergen. The advent of railway in 1883 gradually reduced water traffic in the area.
Click for larger image
Kallestadsundet Bridge
Approaching the Kallestadsundet Bridge in the tender. The 600-ft (200m) bridge, opened in 1985, was the first bridge to connect Osteroy island to the mainland.
Click for larger image
Hesjedalsfossen
The spectacular 300-ft (90m) twin waterfall Hesjedalsfossen, with an old stone bridge crossing the outflow at bottom left. The river is the only one in the Vaksdal municipality that hasn’t been diverted for hydroelectric power.
Click for larger image
Tunnel Window
Window in the road tunnel Hesjadalstunnelen just north of Hesjedalsfossen.
Click for larger image
Mysteralva
The bridge over the river Mysteralva with the 1925 Eidsland church partly visible at left.
Click for larger image
Romarheimsfjorden
Dramatic scenery in Romarheimsfjorden.
Click for larger image
Mostraumen
Approaching the narrow gorge Mostraumen. The narrow and shallow gorge is a popular destination for tourist day-cruise boats from Bergen. The waterway initially was a river through which boats were towed through to reach the lake Motvatnet until a 1743 flood altered the river enough that saltwater reached the lake at higher tides and it became Mofjorden. The channel was deepened in 1886 and again in 1913, bringing it to a depth of 11.5ft (3.5m) so steamships could pass through even at low tide. The lake Motvatnet was probably several meters higher than Mofjorden is today.
Click for larger image
Tender
Enjoying the trip through Mostraumen in the tender. We were considering bringing Dirona through, but the combination of relatively shallow water and current made the tender a better choice.
Click for larger image
Castle in Modalen
The 650-ft (200m) rock formation known as the “Castle in Modelan” is a miniature version of the more famous Pulpit Rock.
Click for larger image
Mo
The town of Mo at the head of Mofjorden with Kvernhusfossen flowing down from over 650ft (200m) on the left.
Click for larger image
Lunch
Lunch at a private picnic table in Mo with a view to Kvernhusfossen.
Click for larger image
Bargsaa
The view east from our picnic spot is pretty nice too. This is looking across Mofjorden to the waterfall from the river Bargsaa.
Click for larger image
Dirona
Back at Dirona moored off Stamnshella after a fabulous 61-nm tender trip of the area. We sure love having a high-speed, comfortable and capable tender.
Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


If your comment doesn't show up right away, send us email and we'll dredge it out of the spam filter.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.