Gripnesvagen


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Gripnesvagen is a beautiful, nearly land-locked anchorage at the north end of Tysnes with a great view to the islands’s highest point, 2467-ft (752m) Tysnessata. From the east side of Tysnes we cruised through the narrow and scenic channel Lukksund to spend two nights at Gripnesvagen, where we toured the area by tender, hiked up Tysnessata on a clear and sunny morning, and enjoyed the idyllic anchorage.

Below are highlights from Aug 18th to 20th, 2020. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

8/18/2020
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Hovlandsnuten
A final view to 2,385ft (727m) Hovlandsnuten, the backdrop for our anchorage of the past three nights at the island Sandsoya off Tysnes.
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Lukksund
Heading north under the bridge across the narrow and scenic channel Lukksund. We passed through here in 2018 on our way south from Bergen towards Stavanger.
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Odda Weather
We eventually plan to spend some time in Odda at the end of Hardangerfjord to do several hikes, including to the famous Trolltunga. But the weather isn’t looking great for the next week, so we’ll spend some time nearer to the mouth of the fjord until the outlook improves.
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Synninga
Running the intimate channel Synninga into our intended anchorage of Gripnesvagen at the north end of the island of Tysnes.
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Gripnesvagen
Looking west from the beautiful anchorage at sheltered Gripnesvagen on an ultra-calm morning.
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Boat Deck
We’ve not used the boat deck table for ages, so decided to put it into use again to have lunch up top in the warm weather with a great all-around view to the anchorage.
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Hanging Fenders
We like the stack-side storage location for our two large Polyform fenders, but find it a bit of a job to wrestle them into place and attach a ratchet strap. So we devised a hanging system for them where we clip each fender to a carabiner suspended from a fold-down stack step. This makes them much easier to manage, and lifting them gives a little more space for working around the tender.
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Spitfire
Spitfire is a bit of a mimic and has learned to hug back with his paws around James’ neck.
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Evening Calm
Evening calm in the anchorage at Gripnesvagen (clockwise from top left: forward, aft, starboard and port).
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Sunset
Spectacular orange sunset at Gripnesvagen.
8/19/2020
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Grunnesund Bridge
About to pass under the Grunnesund Bridge on a tender tour of Lygrespollen.
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Sundvor
A few houses in the town of Sundvor on the north shore of Lygrespollen, reflected into still waters.
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Swans
As we passed these swans, they swam towards us with wings lifted threateningly and chased us surprisingly quickly. We suspect they don’t want us near their nest or perhaps young.
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Reflection
Near-perfect reflections in the ultra-calm head of Lygrespollen.
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Munkholmen
Running the tender through the narrow and shallow channel between the island of Munkholmen and the mainland.
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Sundvor Church
Sundvor Church, at the mouth of Lygrespollen, was bult in 1927.
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Dusk
Dusk in the calm and sheltered anchorage at Gripnesvagen. The winds have been unusually calm for the past few days.
8/20/2020
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Humlevik
The tender tied off at Humlevik for an early-morning hike up Tysnessata. We’re taking advantage of the clear weather forecast for the view hike, as we expect cloudy skies this afternoon.
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Destination
Our destination, 2467-ft (752m) Tysnessata, from partway to the trailhead.
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Trailhead
At the Tysnessata trailhead, about half-hour’s walk from the tender, with a 753 ft (229 m) altitude gain.
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Break
Taking a break and enjoying the view from 1732 ft (528 m), about halfway to the top of 2467-ft (752m) Tysnessata from the trailhead. The trail is short at only 1.1 miles (1.9km), but steep, with an average grade of 28%.
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Tysnessata Summit
Enjoying the spectacular view from the summit of 2467-ft (752m) Tysnessata. We reached the summit about an hour from the trailhead and 1.5 hours from the tender.
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Tysnessata View
The sweeping panoramic view from the summit of 2467-ft (752m) Tysnessata (click image for a larger view). Longtime blog reader and Bergen resident Tronde Saetre, who has been giving us lots of excellent local travel advice, recommended the hike and we really enjoyed it.
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Kattnakken
Looking west from the summit of Tysnessata to the TV tower on 2,375ft (724m) Kattnakken, that we hiked up ten days ago.
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Gripnesvagen
View from the summit of Tysnessata to Dirona anchored at Gripnesvagen.
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Bjornafjorden
Bjornafjorden, north of Tysnes, viewed from the summit of Tysnessata.
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View Cabin
Beautiful summer cabin with 270° views on Koloya as we pass through Koloysundet on the way back to Dirona.
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Dirona
Irene Johansen sent us this picture taken from their porch of Dirona anchored in Gripnesvagen with Tysnessata visible in the distance.
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Synninga
Returning back out through Synninga from the anchorage at Gripnesvagen. We’d really enjoyed our stay there, but other adventures beckon.
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Ersvaervagen
Lunch on the “newly-reopened” boat deck in the anchorage at Ersvaervagen.
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Boo-Boo
While we were having lunch, Spitfire was roaming around on the boat deck. We heard him yowl and rushed over just as he pulled himself back up onto the boat deck from the eyebrow bimini. You can see the widely-spaced claw marks where he’d tried to stop his slide. We’re lucky he didn’t fall all the way.
8/21/2020
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Dawn
Dawn looking east from the anchorage at Ersvaervagen. The days are getting shorter now—it’s 5:40 and barely light out.
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Arabladsundet Bridge
All our charts show a 16m clearance for this bridge across Arabladsundet from Tysnes to Klinkholmen. The Norwegian charts have so far been amazingly accurate—this is the first obvious error we’ve encountered.
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Sundaholmen Bridges
These two bridges from Klinkholmen to the island of Sundaholmen (left) and across to Reksteren also are charted as 16m. We’ll take the left one :).
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Lysoy
The hybrid ferry Lysoy on the busy Halhjem-Sandvikvag route.
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Seifjord
The boxy-shaped workboat Seifjord at a fishfarm off the island of Fonno. Blog reader Trond Saetre told us this widespread design is due to licensing restrictions. An under-15m license is easier to get and far more common, so many boats are built just under 15m and then as tall and as wide as they can possibly make them.
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Seihav
A proliferation of AIS targets off the island of Fonna was two tugs helping the fish carrier Seihav into position at a fish farm. Several other workboats were in the vicinity, including the workboat Seifjord.
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Fitjar
Looking across the shipyard at Fitjar on the island of Stord to a wind farm on the west coast of Tysnes.
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Pilapollen
Entering the narrow and shallow channel into the anchorage at Pilapollen. The cove looked sheltered and protected, ideal for the big winds we are expecting. But swing room was a little restricted, especially with a municipal dock jutting out from the north shore. So we decided to look for another place.
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Half Million Views
Our video, “Preparing Dirona for the North Atlantic Crossing,” just crossed a half-million views. It’s by far our most popular, and the rest are at https://www.youtube.com/user/mvdirona.
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Tender Ride
We found a sheltered and roomy anchorage in the Eldoy islands and set out on a tender tour of the area.
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Ole Kvernenes Boat Yard
Two boats on the hard at the boatyard Ole Kvernenes boat yard in the town of Kalvied just outside of Fitjar.
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FMV
The FMV shipyard dominates the skyline at Fitjar. We’d noticed their welcoming sign on the way past towards Pilapollen and came back in the tender for a closer look.
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Hordagut
The 272ft (83m) hybrid fish carrier Hordagut at the FMV shipyard. The hull was built in Turkey and the ship is being fitted out here in Norway. The main engine was recently started for the first time on June 22.
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Hekkingen
The Kystverket (Norwegian Coastal Administration) hybrid ship, OV Hekkingen, was built at FMV shipyard along with award-winning sistership OV Ryvingen.
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Lunch
Enjoying lunch in the cockpit in the Eldoy islands before a weather system hits.
8/22/2020
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38 Knots
The expected weather system arrived last night. We recorded gusts to 38 knots overnight in the sheltered Eldoy islands.
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SeaFire Test
We annually test our SeaFire automatic fire control system installed in the engine room. Here you can see the indicator lights that trigger when the SeaFire system detects fire although, in this case, it’s just our manually triggering the system at the fire bottle to test warning lights and engine shutdown. The “Fire” light is red, signaling that the engine room fire control system has triggered. The “SeaFir” light at bottom right is red, signaling that the engine room fire control system has triggered. The large “Chk” light at bottom left is also set red by this. Because the generator was running and was shut down by the SeaFire test, the “Gen” indicator light near bottom center is also showing red. For the same reason, the “Wing” light at bottom right is showing orange. Unrelated, the satellite Internet system (KVH V7hts) is showing blue (near bottom left) because it’s not currently running.

The indicators are helpful, but the most important is that all engines shut down as soon as the fire system detects fire. This ensures that when the fire suppression chemicals are released into the engine room they stay in there and suppress the fire, rather than being quickly consumed by a running engine and pushed out the exhaust pipe.

The next part of the test is to press the override button on the SeaFire system and ensure that the engines can now all be restarted. Finally, the fire control system is hooked back up and restarted which re-arms it.

8/23/2020
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Morning Calm
After a day of big winds, conditions are wonderfully calm in the Eldoy islands.
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Feeding Swans
A family of swans arrived, demanding a handout. We complied.
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Dirona
View to Dirona in the Eldoy islands as we set out on a tender tour through the myriad islands and complex waterways in the area.
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Litleholmen
Colorful summer cabins in the sheltered cove Litleholmen at the northern end of the island of Ivarsoy.
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Footbridge
Footbridge over the narrow gap between near-connected Engesund and Skatholmen.
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Port Steingard
The modern development of Port Steingard at the Krako islands. At left is one of five planned stolpehus (post houses), evoking traditional Norsk houses built on posts. The smaller buildings on the right are designed after the overnight cabins local fishers used when the grounds were more than a day’s travel away by sail and oar.
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View Home
Beautiful view home overlooking Port Steingard.
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En Liten Ol
This building at Port Steingard houses the microbrewery En Liten Ol, a cafe and a gift shop. All appeared to be closed, likely due to the pandemic. Not going into restaurants and bars hasn’t been a big deal, but in normal times we would have loved to stop in for a pint on the deck.
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Canal
The Port Steingard development includes beautifully-built small boat canal connecting Hellandsfjorden to Steingardseidosen.
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Storavatnet
Active rapids where the large lake Storavatnet drains into Hellandsfjorden. A small footbridge crosses the waterway, with a dam just visible beyond.
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360-Degree View
We loved this modern hilltop home, with its fabulous 360-degree view over Hellandsfjorden and Steingardseidosen.
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Lifeboat
Large old-style ship’s lifeboat moored at a property at the south end of Ivarsoy. It’s been there long enough to show up on the satellite imagery.
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Wind Farm
The wind farm on Tysenes lit up with a beam of sunshine.
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Rainbow
Our tender tour of Stokksund ended in a downpour, but the reward was this beautiful rainbow over the anchorage at the Eldoy islands.
8/24/2020
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Sandvikvag Ferry Dock
We were amazed to watch as not one, but two ferries landed in tiny cove Sandvikvagen on the north end of Stord. The space looks even more restricted on the satellite imagery. The captains really have to work for a living on this one.
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Waterfall I
After yesterday’s downpour, we’re seeing waterfalls everywhere as we run Langenuen between Stord and Tysnes.
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Waterfall II
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Waterfall III
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Loype
Waterfall from the Loype river on Skorpo, at the scenic channel Laukhammarsundet that we toured through by tender a week ago.
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Melderskin
View to 4678-ft (1426m) Melderskin that we hiked a week ago. It seems hard to believe that we actually were way up at the top of that mountain.
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Hatlestrand
Anchored for the night at Hatlestrand, with great views north and south into Hardangerfjord.
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Fire Control System
The engine room fire control system will shut down all engines when it releases the fire fighting chemicals into the engine room. This is important because, otherwise, a running engine will quickly ingest all the fire control chemicals before they have had time to suppress the fire. We test the fire control system annually to ensure it operates as designed.

Both the wing and generator electronic engine control systems were installed to operate correctly when signaled by the fire control systems, but here James is adding support so that the fire control system triggering will interrupt the wing and generator emergency stop circuit. This approach requires no logic or settings to be enabled—it just works. It’s a better approach to positive shutdown, but does require that a wire be run from each engine controller in the engine room up to the fire control system in the pilot house. We decided it was worth the work so we made the change.

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Fuel Transfer Filter
Once a year we drain off a small portion of fuel from the fuel transfer filter to check for water. Any fuel moved to the supply tank or the day tank has to pass first through the transfer filter so, if there is water, it usually shows up here first. But it’s also possible that it could accumulate in the supply tank.

At least once a year we run the transfer pump for a few minutes, drawing from and returning to the supply tank. This ensures the transfer filter captures any water that might have accumulated in the supply tanks. We then then check for water anywhere in the system by taking a fuel sample from the transfer filter. We drain a 1/4 cup of fuel, check for water, then pour it back into the fuel tanks. What we find is that modern fuel supplies are remarkably good. In more than 20 years of boating we have seen serious water problems only once on our previous boat and the fuel filters easily filtered it out. In more than 10 years of using this current boat, we have only found water twice and never more than a few ounces.

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Software Developer Cut
Since leaving Seattle in 2012, James has often resorted to what we call a “software developer cut,” where I, a software developer, cut his hair. I usually get my hair cut professionally, but we’re often away from civilization for extended periods, so cutting my own bangs is sometimes the best we can do. With the pandemic, it’s been a while since I’ve had a professional cut. So I finally decided I also “needed” a software developer cut and asked James to trim the back of my hair. He did OK, but I don’t see him retiring on his newly-found skills :-).
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Evening Calm
Calm conditions at Hatlestrand, looking south towards Rosendal. 4678-ft (1426m) Melderskin is on the left, the summit hidden in clouds.
8/25/2020
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Viking Norsafe
The Viking Norsafe Academy at Arsnes on the east side of Hardangerfjord is one of three Viking maritime safety training facilities. The Danish company Viking acquired the Norwegian lifeboat builder Norsafe in 2018.
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Ferry
Ferry underway from Arsnes with a waterfall high on the cliff beyond.
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Aenes Church
The Aenes Church was built around 1200. The wals are 4.6ft (1.4m) thick, which partly explains how it has stood for so long.
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Aenes Light
Light on the peninsula at Aenes with the mountains of Maurangsfjorden visible beyond.
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Furebergsfossen
Spectacular Furebergsfossen flowing into Maurangsfjorden. The waterfall is over 500ft (150m) high, about 325ft (98m) of which is pictured. At 230ft (70m) wide, it is among the widest waterfalls in Norway.
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Sundal
Moored at Sundal for a couple of nights to explore the area by tender and hike up to get our closest view yet to the Folgefonna glaciers.
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Sundal from Tender
Looking back from the tender to our berth at Sundal with the Bondhusbrea Glacier, an offshoot of the Folgefonna glaciers, visible in the background. We plan to hike up to the glacier tomorrow.
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Nodrepollen
Mountains and waterfall reflected in still waters, looking towards the head of Nodrepollen, the northern of two arms that branch off the head of Maurangsfjorden. The Tveltelva river waterfall is on the left and the Reppafossen is at center and right.
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Tveltelva
Waterfall from the river Tveltelva flowing into the head of Nodrepollen.
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Reppafossen
The top of the waterfall Reppafossen flowing down from 2,300ft (700m) into Nodrepollen.
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Flatebo
The town of Flatebo beneath 1,200m mountains at the head of Nodrepollen.
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Austrepollen
Looking down Austrepollen, the southern of the two arms branching off the head of Maurangsfjorden.
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Tailrace
Tailrace from the 250MW Mauranger power plant at the head of Austrepollen.
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Ripelsatta
3,500ft (1,085m) Ripelsatta, slightly right of center, amid other cone-shaped peaks along the north side of Austrepollen.
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Furebergsfossen by Tender
View from the tender to the Furebergsfossen we passed earlier today in Dirona en route to Sundal.
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Base of Falls
Jennifer taking in the Furebergsfossen from ashore at the base of the falls.
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Flow
The tremendous flow from the waterfall Furebergsfossen.
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Kroka Power Plant
The 470 kW Kroka Power Plant building on the south shore of Maurangsfjorden is designed to look like a cabin, complete with lace curtains and photograph frames on the windowsill.
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Bondhuselva
The river Bondhuselva flowing through Sundal into Maurangsfjorden. The outlet is right off our stern.
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Aquaculture
Looking west across aquaculture in Sundal with Maurangsfjorden visible in the background. The guest harbour is hidden behind the the cement structure at left.
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Log Splitter
A Dalen 2054 log splitter in Sundal. With an 8-ton splitting force, the fully hydraulic machine can split a log in 2.7 seconds. It runs off a tractor PTO and requires as little as 40HP.
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Bale Wrapper
A bale wrapper in Sundal, a simpler version of the one we saw in Tveit.
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Footbridge
Crossing a footbridge over the river Bondhuselva.
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Sundal
View south to Sundal and our berth. The RV campground that we’re moored in front of was at least half-full when we arrived, but is nearly empty mid-afternoon. By evening, it had filled up again.
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Bondhusbrea
Close-up to Bondhusbrea Glacier from the boat deck while moored at Sundal. The weather looks good for a hike up there tomorrow.
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Happy Hour
Happy hour on the boat deck at Sundal with a view to beautiful Maurangsfjorden.
8/26/2020
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Maurangsfjorden
Looking back to Maurangsfjorden on an early-morning start to the hike up Fonnabu.
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Trail Map
Three hikes lead towards the Folgefonna glaciers. We’ll be taking the left fork, 6.8 miles (11km) to the glacier’s plateau at 4,757ft (1,453m) Fonnabu, estimated at 5 hours one-way. The other two trails are easier hikes, one to the lake Bondhusvatnet, and the other to below the Bondhusbrea Glacier that we can see from our berth in Sundal.
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Destination
Our destination, (1,453m) Fonnabu, is beyond those mountains in the distance. We’ve got a ways to go.
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Path
The shared path between the several hikes is wide and beautifully maintained. The path follows an old road to the lake Bondhusvatnet built in 1863 to transport fallen ice from the the Bondhusbrea Glacier for export. The ice was carried across Bondhusvatnet in large rowboats, than horses transported it to the pier. The enterprise was not successful as the melt was too great before the ice reached its destination, and the road became mainly a tourist route.
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Bondhuselva
View to the river Bondhuselva from a bridge en route.
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Keiserstien
We’ve left the common path and at 928 ft (283 m) are at the start of a historic tourist route, Keiserstien, that leads up and over the glacier plateau. The road was completed in 1890 to carry tourists up an over the glacier between Sundal and Odda on horse-drawn carriages and sleighs.
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Switchbacks
At altitude 2029 ft (618 m) near the top of the series of switchbacks shown in the Keiserstien photograph. In 2007, the old path was renovated to its original width as far as the first set of cabins we’ll encounter. The walking is easy, but is still tiring due to the steepness.
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Bondhusvatnet
View to the lake Bondhusvatnet with two waterfalls flowing down 500m cliffs along the west side. It’s a wonderfully calm, clear day and the Krokelva waterfall on the right is reflected almost perfectly in the lake surface.
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Gardshammerstolen
Taking a break by the trekking cabins of Gardshammerstolen. We’re now at altitude 2456 ft (748 m), about halfway to Fonnabu from Dirona by both distance and altitude.
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Sundal
View back to Sundal from the cabins at Gardshammerstolen.
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Cold
We were in short-sleeves up to Gardshammerstolen, but the temperature is much colder up here with the sun still behind the mountains. So we’re continuing from the cabins wearing coats and gloves. It’s not often in one day that you can be wearing a T-shirt and sweating profusely, and an half-hour later be wearing many layers of coat and gloves, and within an hour be back to T-shirts again.
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Botnavatnet
Reflections in still waters at the lake Botnavatnet at altitude 2755 ft (840 m).
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Krokavatnet
At altitude 3,487 ft (1,063 m), we’re now above the lake Krokavatnet sitting at 2600ft (794m) that feeds the northern waterfall flowing into the lake Bondhusvatnet
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Trail Below
Looking down from altitude 3,735 ft (1,138 m) to the trail beside lake Botnavatnet that we walked about 40 minutes earlier.
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Nearing Breidablikk
A first view to the cabin at Breidablikk on the ridge in the distance, slightly right of center (click image for larger view).
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Crossing Ice
The trail crosses a narrow section of ice coated in a thin layer of water that was so slippery Jennifer just crawled across.
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Steps
Climbing stone steps at altitude 4,083 ft (1,244 m) on the final stretch to the cabin at Breidablikk.
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Breidablikk
Norwegian Trekking Association cabin and old sleigh at altitude 4333ft (1321m). We’re getting close to Fonnabu now. Only an hour more to go along a ridge with little more altitude gain.
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Breidablikkbrea
View to the Breidablikkbrea glacier, an offshoot of the Folgefonna glaciers, from Breidablikk. We’ll be walking alongside and above it to Fonnabu.
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Fonnanuten
At the summit of 4,767ft (1,453m) Fonnanuten, the highest point on our hike. We’ll descend slightly from here to the cabins at Fonnabu.
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View to Fonnabu
Our destination of the cabins at Fonnabu, in the far distance near the end of the point, with the southern Folgefonna glacier in the background. After getting closer and closer to the glacier on each hike, we were super-excited to finally be right there.
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Lake and Snow
The scenery between Breidablikk and Fonnabu was particularly impressive, with mountain lakes filled with melting snow.
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Fonnabu
One of several beautiful modern cabins at Fonnabu. Unlike most of our other hikes, nobody else was here when we were and we only saw two other pairs of hikers the entire way up and one more group on the way back down.
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Folgefonna Glacier
Panoramic view east to the southern Folgefonna glacier across two more of the Fonnabu cabins. Some people hike up to Fonnabu, spend the night and return back down. But another popular option is to cross the glacier to a cabin on the other side and then down to Odda at the head of Hardangerfjord on the third day.
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Fonnabu from South
We really wanted to get closer to the glacier, so continued south from Fonnabu. This is looking back to the huts as we went beyond them. It’s just amazingly beautiful up here.
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Glacier Edge
Enjoying the view to the edge of the glacier.
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Lunch
A picnic lunch with a view to the Folgefonna glacier. We’re really loving being up here.
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Atop Folgefonna
Walking out onto the Folgefonna glacier was the highlight of our hike to Fonnabu. It was a challenging hike, at 8 total miles (12km) one-way from Dirona with an altitude gain of 4,767ft (1,453m), but very much worth the effort.
8/27/2020
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Bondhusbrea Glacier
A final view to Bondhusbrea Glacier as we depart Sundal just after sunrise.
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Maurangsfjorden
Cruising down Maurangsfjorden from Sundal at 7am. The days are getting shorter now with winter approaching.
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Injury
James slipped on the Fonnabu trail yesterday and injured his left wrist and right thumb. It’s difficult to tell if they’re broken or just severely sprained, but the swelling and discoloration are pretty severe. We’re applying ice and compression and hopefully they’ll heal quickly.
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With Harvest
The cargo ship With Harvest towering over the fish farm building where it is briefly moored. We saw this ship frequently on our last trip to Norway, and its our second sighting on this year’s cruise. In this picture, they’re using a conveyor crane to offload fish food into silos on either side of the maintenance building.
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Holmsundet
Passing through narrow and scenic Holmsundet en route to the beautiful anchorage off Herand.
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Eco Adventure
We’ve not seen much organized tourism since we returned to Norway. This eco adventure boat is the first one we’ve seen underway.
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Tysnes Newspaper
Reporter Ella Sandra Dahl Berland of the Tysenes local newspaper spotted us at anchor off the island and contacted us for an interview. The article was printed today. The cover is here and the full article is here (Norwegian only).
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Sunset
Sunset from the anchorage at Herand.
8/28/2020
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Hardangerfjord
Hardangerfjord is the second longest fjord in Norway at 96 nautical miles long, and the fourth longest in the world. When we made a day trip there by car from Bergen in 2018, we really wished we had time to take Dirona down the scenic waterway. Today we finally did, and it was even more beautiful than we remembered. Here we are cruising south towards Odda in the longest of Hardangerfjord’s branching arms, 20nm Sorfjorden.
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Aednafossen
Aednafossen, fed by the Folgefonna Icefield, is one of the most widest and dramatic in Norway. The falls are 1,050 ft (320 m) high and widen out to a veiled section about 540ft (165m) wide, then narrows for the final 400ft (125m). It’s unusual for a waterfall to widen and then narrow again like that.
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Tyssedal
The Tyssedal power station was built between 1906 and 1918 and operated until 1989. It was one of the largest pressure power plants in the world when it first came online in 1918 with a production capacity of 100MW. The building is considered one of the best of Norway’s 20th-century architecture. The building now houses the Norwegian Museum of Hydropower and Industry, that we toured on our day trip to Hardangefjord in 2018.

The penstocks (supply lines) for the power plant are visible heading straight up the cliff behind. A Via Ferrata course that we hope to climb runs alongside.

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TiZir
The TiZir Titanium & Iron plant has been operating in Hardangerfjord since 1986. Only in Norway could a large industrial facility look beautiful.
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Approaching Odda
Approaching the town of Odda, in a spectacular setting at the head of Sorfjorden.
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Odda Views
Views from our berth in Odda (clockwise from top left: forward, aft, starboard and port). It’s a fabulous spot. Oddly, no power or water is available at the guest harbour, but we’re fine with the generator. And the tourist office at upper left will run a hose out to us to fill our water when we need it.
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Posten
The first order of the day was a stop at the Post Office in Odda to pick up the replacement hiking boots we’d ordered for James.
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Slash
Metal statue of Guns ‘n Roses guitarist Slash we passed on the way back to Dirona from the Post Office.
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New Boots
A happy James with his new hiking boots to replace the ones that recently failed. Jennifer has a pair of Salomon Quest Prime boots that she really likes and have lasted well since purchase two years ago, so we got a pair for James.
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Odda Guest Harbour
View to Dirona moored at Odda Guest Harbour with 4,530ft (1,381m) Ruklenuten in the background.
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Historic Photographs
Throughout Odda, large historic photographs are mounted on old buildings transform make the structures look like artwork. We love a city that’s proud of it’s industrial heritage.
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Thord Paulsen AS
Capable-looking tow truck at Thord Paulsen AS. Longtime blog reader and Stockholm resident Torbjorn Curtsson told us that Thord Paulsen is one of the stars of the National Geographic reality TV series “Ice Road Rescue“.
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Lunch
Lunch on the boat deck at Odda with a fabulous view north down Sorfjorden.
Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


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