River Liffey


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The River Liffey runs through the center of Dublin and has long been a source of water, recreation and commerce for the city. Trade along the river was recorded as early as the Viking days and the first bridge across was built in 1428. Up until the 1990s, cargo ships transported Guinness for export from the riverside St. James Street Brewery.

Today at least two dozen bridges span the flow in the Dublin area, many dating from the 1800s. And while the river still carries significant commercial traffic, most is near the mouth at busy Dublin Port. And along the shores are historical centuries-old buildings side-by-side with modern masterpieces.

From our berth at Dun Laoghaire marina, we ran the tender 2.5 miles north to the river mouth and spent the afternoon touring to the navigable limit. After, we made quick tour of the River Dodder, a tributary of the Liffey.

Below are highlights from April 17th, 2021. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

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Dawn
Dawn at our berth in Dun Laoghaire marina.
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Sunrise
Spectacular orange sunrise over the Dun Laoghaire harbour walls.
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East Pier Light
The light on the end of the Dun Laoghaire harbour east pier, viewed from the tender.
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Poolbeg Lighthouse
The Poolbeg Lighthouse was erected in 1820 on the end of the breakwater protecting the entrance into the Dublin Port.
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Poolbeg Stacks
The 680-ft (207m) twin chimneys of the Poolbeg Generating Station are among the tallest structures in Ireland and are visible throughout Dublin. We can even see them from our boat in Dun Laoghaire.
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Port of Dublin
Looking up the River Liffey into busy Dublin Port.
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Stena Horizon
The 610ft (186m) superferry Stena Horizon operates a regular run between Ireland and France with a maximum capacity of 200 cars and 900 passengers. We saw the vessel departing while we were arriving into Dun Laoghaire
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Laureline
The RO/RO Laureline with tug assist for docking at Dublin Port. The ship was recently put on a route from Dublin to Belgium in response to increased demand for direction shipping between Ireland and continental Europe following Brexit.
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Giano
The beautiful tractor tug Giano of London moored at Dublin Port. Among the tug’s many innovative features is the capability for remote control via a 4G or VSAT connection.
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Samuel Beckett Bridge
The graceful Samuel Beckett Bridge resembles a harp, the national symbol for Ireland.
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Convention Centre
The iconic Convention Centre Dublin, completed in 2010, is the first carbon-neutral convention center in the world.
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Custom House
The Custom House over the Liffey River in Dublin was built in 1781 in the neo-classical style. After Dublin Port operations moved further downstream, the building has housed various government departments.
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O’Connell Bridge
The granite O’Connell bridge is one of many historic bridges spanning the River Liffey. The bridge was originally built in 1794, then reconstructed and widened in 1882.
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Ha’penny Bridge
The cast-iron Ha’penny pedestrian bridge was built in 1816 and replaced several ferries that crossed the River Liffey. The name derives from the ha’penny toll required of anyone crossing the bridge in its first 100 years.
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Important Cargo
A truckload of Guinness heading off from the brewery.
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Four Courts
The Four Courts buildings were built between 1786 and 1802 for the four superior courts. Today the buildings house the Supreme Court, the Court of Appeal, the High Court and the Dublin Circuit Court.
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Saint Paul’s
Saint Paul’s is a former Catholic church building completed in 1837.
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Rory O’ More Bridge
The Rory O’ More cast-iron road bridge was completed in 1859.
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Guinness
A view to the expansive 50-acre Guinness brewery along the River Liffey. We toured the brewery on our previous visit to Dublin.
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Sean Heuston Bridge
The elegant cast-iron Sean Heuston Bridge dates from 1821.
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Phoenix Iron Works
The old wall and River Liffey loading area of Phoenix Iron Works, established in 1808.
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Rowers
One of several pairs of friendly rowers in historic wooden boats.
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Wellington Testimonial
The Wellington Testimonial was built between 1817 and 1861 to commemorate the victories of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, who ended the Napoleonic Wars by defeating Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. The project ran short on funds, extending the build time greatly.
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Narrows
The River Liffey was mostly wide and easily navigable for several miles. This narrow and shallow channel is the end of the navigable route.
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Waterfall
Man-made waterfall at the end of the navigable route from sea along the River Liffey. The river is navigable above the falls, where several rowing clubs are located.
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Ha’penny Bridge Inn
The Ha’penny Bridge Inn had been in continuous use as a public house since 1732.
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Abbey Court
The brightly-painted Abbey Court hostel along the River Liffey.
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O’Connell Bridge
Low clearance returning back under the O’Connell Bridge.
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Jeanie Johnston
The Jeanie Johnston, a 1998 replica of a three-masted barque, is used for sail training at sea and in port is a museum on 19th-century emigration.
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Brewdog
Large Brewdog pub at the entrance to the Grand Canal connecting the west and east coasts of Ireland.
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Street Art
Several artists were painting at the S Dock Rd Street Art display along the River Dodder, a tributary of the River Liffey.
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St Patricks
St Patricks Roman Catholic Church along the River Dodder was completed in 1859.
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Shelbourne Park
Shelbourne Park is a large, modern greyhound racing track along the River Dodder.
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Aviva Stadium
It was difficult to get far enough away from Aviva Stadium to really capture the spectacular glass structure. Completed in 2010, the facility is home to the Irish rugby union team and the Republic of Ireland football team.
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Swan
Swan along the River Dodder fending us away from the left shoreline, probably protecting a nest.
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River Dodder
The end of the navigable path for us along the River Dodder.
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DPC Tolka
The pilot boat DPC Tolka returning to Dublin Port. The port took delivery of the modern vessel in late 2019 that will allow pilots to reach ships in all weather conditions and farther out into Dublin Bay than the current pilot boats.
Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


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