Sundal


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Sundal has been a major tourist destination since the mid 1800s, when people flocked to the area to ascend the Folgefonna icefield. Initially visitors walked up to the glacier and crossed with horses and sleighs, but by 1890 demand was sufficient to build a carriage road up to the plateau.

150 years later, reaching the glaciers was our reason for visiting Sundal as well. We’d been progressively nearing Folgefonna on our recent hikes through the area, and were excited at the prospect of viewing it up close. The icefield is not the only attraction at Sundal though. The town is situated along Maurangsfjorden, a 7.5-mile (12 km) fjord that branches into two arms amid soaring cliffs and countless waterfalls, including Furebergsfossen, one of the widest in Norway.

From the Eldoy Islands, we stopped for the night at Hatlestrand before continuing on to Sundal, passing fabulous Furebergsfossen en route. Once moored at Sundal, we toured the area by tender, taking in the spectacular scenery and returning to Furebergsfossen for a closer look.

Below are highlights from Aug 24th and 25th, 2020. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

8/24/2020
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Sandvikvag Ferry Dock
We were amazed to watch as not one, but two ferries landed in tiny cove Sandvikvagen on the north end of Stord. The space looks even more restricted on the satellite imagery. The captains really have to work for a living on this one.
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Waterfall I
After yesterday’s downpour, we’re seeing waterfalls everywhere as we run Langenuen between Stord and Tysnes.
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Waterfall II
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Waterfall III
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Loype
Waterfall from the Loype river on Skorpo, at the scenic channel Laukhammarsundet that we toured through by tender a week ago.
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Melderskin
View to 4678-ft (1426m) Melderskin that we hiked a week ago. It seems hard to believe that we actually were way up at the top of that mountain.
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Hatlestrand
Anchored for the night at Hatlestrand, with great views north and south into Hardangerfjord.
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Fire Control System
The engine room fire control system will shut down all engines when it releases the fire fighting chemicals into the engine room. This is important because, otherwise, a running engine will quickly ingest all the fire control chemicals before they have had time to suppress the fire. We test the fire control system annually to ensure it operates as designed.

Both the wing and generator electronic engine control systems were installed to operate correctly when signaled by the fire control systems, but here James is adding support so that the fire control system triggering will interrupt the wing and generator emergency stop circuit. This approach requires no logic or settings to be enabled—it just works. It’s a better approach to positive shutdown, but does require that a wire be run from each engine controller in the engine room up to the fire control system in the pilot house. We decided it was worth the work so we made the change.

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Fuel Transfer Filter
Once a year we drain off a small portion of fuel from the fuel transfer filter to check for water. Any fuel moved to the supply tank or the day tank has to pass first through the transfer filter so, if there is water, it usually shows up here first. But it’s also possible that it could accumulate in the supply tank.

At least once a year we run the transfer pump for a few minutes, drawing from and returning to the supply tank. This ensures the transfer filter captures any water that might have accumulated in the supply tanks. We then then check for water anywhere in the system by taking a fuel sample from the transfer filter. We drain a 1/4 cup of fuel, check for water, then pour it back into the fuel tanks. What we find is that modern fuel supplies are remarkably good. In more than 20 years of boating we have seen serious water problems only once on our previous boat and the fuel filters easily filtered it out. In more than 10 years of using this current boat, we have only found water twice and never more than a few ounces.

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Software Developer Cut
Since leaving Seattle in 2012, James has often resorted to what we call a “software developer cut,” where I, a software developer, cut his hair. I usually get my hair cut professionally, but we’re often away from civilization for extended periods, so cutting my own bangs is sometimes the best we can do. With the pandemic, it’s been a while since I’ve had a professional cut. So I finally decided I also “needed” a software developer cut and asked James to trim the back of my hair. He did OK, but I don’t see him retiring on his newly-found skills :-).
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Evening Calm
Calm conditions at Hatlestrand, looking south towards Rosendal. 4678-ft (1426m) Melderskin is on the left, the summit hidden in clouds.
8/25/2020
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Viking Norsafe
The Viking Norsafe Academy at Arsnes on the east side of Hardangerfjord is one of three Viking maritime safety training facilities. The Danish company Viking acquired the Norwegian lifeboat builder Norsafe in 2018.
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Ferry
Ferry underway from Arsnes with a waterfall high on the cliff beyond.
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Aenes Church
The Aenes Church was built around 1200. The wals are 4.6ft (1.4m) thick, which partly explains how it has stood for so long.
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Aenes Light
Light on the peninsula at Aenes with the mountains of Maurangsfjorden visible beyond.
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Furebergsfossen
Spectacular Furebergsfossen flowing into Maurangsfjorden. The waterfall is over 500ft (150m) high, about 325ft (98m) of which is pictured. At 230ft (70m) wide, it is among the widest waterfalls in Norway.
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Sundal
Moored at Sundal for a couple of nights to explore the area by tender and hike up to get our closest view yet to the Folgefonna glaciers.
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Sundal from Tender
Looking back from the tender to our berth at Sundal with the Bondhusbrea Glacier, an offshoot of the Folgefonna glaciers, visible in the background. We plan to hike up to the glacier tomorrow.
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Nodrepollen
Mountains and waterfall reflected in still waters, looking towards the head of Nodrepollen, the northern of two arms that branch off the head of Maurangsfjorden. The Tveltelva river waterfall is on the left and the Reppafossen is at center and right.
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Tveltelva
Waterfall from the river Tveltelva flowing into the head of Nodrepollen.
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Reppafossen
The top of the waterfall Reppafossen flowing down from 2,300ft (700m) into Nodrepollen.
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Flatebo
The town of Flatebo beneath 1,200m mountains at the head of Nodrepollen.
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Austrepollen
Looking down Austrepollen, the southern of the two arms branching off the head of Maurangsfjorden.
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Tailrace
Tailrace from the 250MW Mauranger power plant at the head of Austrepollen.
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Ripelsatta
3,500ft (1,085m) Ripelsatta, slightly right of center, amid other cone-shaped peaks along the north side of Austrepollen.
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Furebergsfossen by Tender
View from the tender to the Furebergsfossen we passed earlier today in Dirona en route to Sundal.
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Base of Falls
Jennifer taking in the Furebergsfossen from ashore at the base of the falls.
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Flow
The tremendous flow from the waterfall Furebergsfossen.
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Kroka Power Plant
The 470 kW Kroka Power Plant building on the south shore of Maurangsfjorden is designed to look like a cabin, complete with lace curtains and photograph frames on the windowsill.
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Bondhuselva
Returning to Dirona, we took a walk through Sundal along the river Bondhuselva that flows through the town and into Maurangsfjorden. The outlet is right off our stern.
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Aquaculture
Looking west across aquaculture in Sundal with Maurangsfjorden visible in the background. The guest harbour is hidden behind the the cement structure at left.
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Log Splitter
A Dalen 2054 log splitter in Sundal. With an 8-ton splitting force, the fully hydraulic machine can split a log in 2.7 seconds. It runs off a tractor PTO and requires as little as 40HP.
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Bale Wrapper
A bale wrapper in Sundal, a simpler version of the one we saw in Tveit.
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Footbridge
Crossing a footbridge over the river Bondhuselva.
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Sundal
View south to Sundal and our berth. The RV campground that we’re moored in front of was at least half-full when we arrived, but is nearly empty mid-afternoon. By evening, it had filled up again.
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Bondhusbrea
Close-up to Bondhusbrea Glacier from the boat deck while moored at Sundal. The weather looks good for a hike up there tomorrow.
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Happy Hour
Happy hour on the boat deck at Sundal with a view to beautiful Maurangsfjorden.
Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


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