Farsund Arrival


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Our pilot guide describes Farsund as “ice free”, but the entrance to the guest harbour was blocked by ice when we arrived from Andabeloy. Two recent paths through the ice were evident, and we could see clear water beyond, so we selected one that looked from a distance to be mostly clear but with loose chunks. It turned out the larger chunks were actually frozen into two-inch-thick ice. We pushed through, but did scrape an eight-square-inch section of bottom paint off the bow.

We’d come to Farsund en route to Sweden to pickup some winter boots we’d ordered, and were planning to just pick up our boots, have a quick look around and then leave, in case the ice got thicker. But as we were walking along the harbour, the 98-ft (30m) FFS Amaranth arrived through the path we’d just taken. We went spoke to the crew who told us that three tugs were based at the head of the harbour and they frequently came and went. So we felt more comfortable staying since the harbour is clear and the tugs were opening up the channel multiple times per week.

Below are highlights from January 27th, 2021. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

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Lista Lighthouse
The Lista Lighthouse sits at the most southwestern point of mainland Norway. The tower originally was built in 1836, and was rebuilt in 1853.
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Loshavn
The wooden buildings in the town of Loshavn are considered to be the best-preserved along the the southern Norway coast. The town had about 200 residents in 1856, but now most of the buildings are vacation homes or hotels.
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Channel
Approaching the extremely narrow and winding channel at Loshavn. The channel is well-marked, but depths are about 10 ft in places, with shallows close by on either side. We barely fit.
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Sondre Katland Lighthouse
The Sondre Katland Lighthouse to our southeast was completed in 1878.
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Ice
The entrance to the Farsund guest harbour was blocked by ice, but we could see clear water beyond. Our pilot guide describes Farsund as “ice free”, with no “during normal winters” caveat, so we must be seeing unusually cold temperatures. Two recent paths through the ice were evident, and we selected one that looked from a distance to be mostly clear but with loose chunks. It turned out the larger chunks were actually frozen into two-inch-thick ice. We pushed through, but did scrape eight-square-inch section of bottom paint off the bow.
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Lundevagen
The bay Lundevagen, east of the Farsund guest harbour completely frozen in.
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Seagulls
There’s an unusual sight, at least for us: seagulls standing on the frozen water as we navigate past.
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Farsund
Moored at the Farsund guest harbour. As you can see, the harbour area is clear and ice free.
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Posten
At the Posten (post office) to pick-up some winter boots we’d ordered while in Haugesund.
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Winter Boots
Jennifer trying out her new Baffin Snogoose winter boots (with Baffin Impact for James). They are super warm—we’re really happy with them. And since we’re both Canadian, we like the fact that Baffin is too.
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Samuelsen and Garbo
Monument to Farsund native Frank Samuelsen and fellow American-Norwegian George Harbo, who in 1896 became the first people to row across the North Atlantic. Their record of 55 days from New York to the Isles of Scilly, UK was eventually broken 114 years later, but by a team of four.
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FFS Amaranth
We were planning to just pick up our boots, have a quick look around and then leave, in case we the ice got thicker. But as we were walking along the harbour, the FFS Amaranth arrived through the path we’d just taken. We went spoke to the crew who told us that three tugs were based at the head of the harbour and they frequently came and went. So we felt more comfortable staying since the harbour is clear and the tugs were opening up the channel multiple times per week.
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Dirona
Dirona moored at east side of the Farsund guest harbour. The post office where we picked up our boots is in the white building behind—it would be difficult to find a more convenient pickup point.
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Farsund Berth
Our berth on the west side of the Farsund guest harbour with 2 16-amp shorepowers connections available (the water is shut off for the winter). We moved over here because no power was available on the east side. And this side is both more private and has a better view to the harbourside buildings where we initially moored.
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Farsund Views
View to Farsund from our berth in the guest harbour (clockwise from top left: forward, aft, starboard and port). The tug FFS Amaranth has left and the FFS Atlas arrived and now is visible behind us in the distance at top right. It’s a wonderful berth and is so private it feels like an anchorage.
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Moonrise
Moonrise at dusk over Farsund and the east side guest harbour docks where we initially moored. What a beautiful town.
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Happy Hour
Happy hour at Farsund with the tug FFS Atlas moored in the background. We enjoy watching the FFS tugs coming and going from their home port berth behind us. The temperature is right at freezing and, since we have power, we can run our patio heater for “free” heat. We’re really loving it here.
Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


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