Fyksesund


Click for larger image

We’ve seen a lot of fish farms in Norway and around the world, but have never set foot on one. So when we learned about the Hardanger Akvasenter, a working fish farm that is open for tours, we contacted them to find out if we could arrange a private visit. The answer was an enthusiastic yes, and we had a great time touring the farm and learning more about the industry. The farm is situated at the mouth of the waterfall-filled Fyksesund, a beautiful arm of Hardangerfjord, that we also toured by tender while we were in the area.

Below are highlights from Sept 8th through 19th, 2020. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

9/8/2020
Click for larger image
Spitfire
Spitfire watching intently as a flock of sparrows swoop on and off “his” bow railings.
Click for larger image
Balaifossen
Balaifossen on the east side of Osafjorden has a drop of more than 2,600 ft (800m), making it one of the highest waterfalls in Norway.
Click for larger image
Cliff Door
A door into a mountain face seems a little unusual, but it connects to a road tunnel behind.
Click for larger image
Dogro
The river Dogro gushing down the cliff behind a small cabin along the east side of Osafjorden.
Click for larger image
Hardanger Bridge
Passing back under the Hardanger Bridge in similarly overcast conditions as our northbound run a few days ago.
Click for larger image
Tveisme Valley
The river Tveismeelvi and other waterfalls flowing down into the dramatic Tveisme Valley just south of the Hardnager Bridge.
Click for larger image
Slattenes Light
The light on the poing Slattenes at the intersection of Sorfjorden and Eidfjorden.
Click for larger image
Hardanger Folkeblad
Sondre Haukedal‘s interview with us at Odda was published in the local newspaper Hardanger Folkeblad today (Norwegian only).
Click for larger image
Kvanndal
The ferry departing Kvanndal under a cliff striped with waterfalls. This is where we boarded the ferry Utnefjord for Utne a few days ago en route to Odda after visiting Vorringfossen.
Click for larger image
Elkem Bjolvefossen
Metal smelter Elkem Bjolvefossen along the north side of Hardangerfjord. The plant went into production in 1918 using power from the purpose-built 98 WM Bjolvo power plant. Initially calcium carbide was produced, but later an electric smelter was added to produce ferrosilicon and ferroalloys.
Click for larger image
Cement Chute
We’re not sure the purpose of this cement chute, with a square opening near the bottom, along the north shore of Hardangerfjord.
Click for larger image
Fykesund
Approaching Fyksesund, a branch of Hardangerfjord, where we’ll anchor near the bridge for a couple of nights. The fish farm in the foreground is the Hardanger Akvasenter, an operational fish farm and display facility. We’re scheduled to tour it this week.
Click for larger image
Watermaker
The watermaker has recently developed a massive inrush current problem on startup, sometimes drawing way more than 8KW. This usually trips the 20A breaker, but sometimes the high-current inrush is sufficiently brief that the breaker stays engaged and the watermaker then runs properly at normal current draws. The possibilities are a seized pump, a failing motor, or the watermaker has some internal problem that dead-heads the pressure output on startup.

Before investigating, we ran the system to fill the tanks since we know it may not restart after service. On investigating, we found the high pressure pump oil (pictured) is at the correct level and clear, without discoloration or metallic impurities. The pump is very likely not the problem, leaving a seized motor or some internal system problem causing pressure dead-heading. The latter is not very likely and sometimes the motor starts with only 11A and other times it draws more than 38A. It’s very likely a failing motor but, for now, we have full water tanks and the watermaker will still work if tried multiple times.

9/9/2020
Click for larger image
Fyksesund Bridge
The single-lane Fyksesund Bridge, opened in 1937, viewed from our anchorage in Fykesund. When completed, it was the longest suspension bridge in Europe and still is the longest “soft suspension bridge” in Norway. This method, common in Norway and pioneered by Norwegian engineer Olaf Stang, uses more flexible and economical rolled steel support beams rather than steel trusses. The bridge suffered aerodynamic-related structural problems but these were corrected in 1945.
Click for larger image
Fridge Switch
The fridge light switch was sticking and we applied some contact cleaner that fixed the problem. The switch mechanism has a rough spot in it that suggests it will probably need replacing.
Click for larger image
Switching Propane
We’ve used up the first of our four UK propane tanks since departing Stornoway and here are switching over to the second. At our current rate of consumption, we have another nine months before we’re out.
9/10/2020
Click for larger image
Fyksesund
View to our anchorage at Fyksesund beneath the Fyksesund Bridge.
Click for larger image
Hardanger Akvasenter
We’ve seen a lot of fish farms in Norway, but have never set foot on one. So when we learned about the Hardanger Akvasenter, a working fish farm that is open for tours, we contacted them to find out if we could arrange a private tour and visit in our tender. The answer was an enthusiastic yes, and Solveig K. Botnen arranged to meet us there. Here she is providing background on the industry and explaining the technology used in the farms before taking us on a tour of the pens. Solveig did a great job and we really enjoyed our tour of the farm and learning more about the industry.
Click for larger image
Fish Pens
The Hardanger Akvasenter is a small farm by Norwegian standards, but uses much of the same modern technology. The feeder in the center uses forced air to distribute pellets into the pen from the white pipe leading in from the left. Workers monitor the pens using underwater cameras and stop feeding if the fish aren’t eating, reducing water pollution and food costs due to wasted food.

Visible in the right of the photo is a roller system with a black net looped over and below it. In the past, farms used divers to clean and mend the pen nets, but a more modern solution is to have two nets and use rollers to transfer the old net out of the pen for maintenance and at the same time install the replacement net.

Click for larger image
Tussagjelet
Waterfall from the river Tussagjelet flowing into Fyksesund.
Click for larger image
Tender Tour
Enjoying the many waterfalls in beautiful Fyksesund in warmth and comfort. The temperature is about 54°F (12°C) but it can get quite cold at speed in the tender. We’re wearing our Mustang 2175s, which are standard issue with the Coast Guard on both sides of the Canada-US border. We can toss these on over light clothing, add a pair of gloves and perhaps a hat, and be instantly warm in the coldest weather.
Click for larger image
Fossabekken
The Fossabekken spilling down 3,000ft into Fyksesund.
Click for larger image
Botnen
The guest harbour in Botnen at the head of Fyksesund, one of the few fjords we’ve visited with no road access to the head.
Click for larger image
Kaldrassen
Fyksesund is just full of waterfalls, particularly after several days of rain. Here we are looking up from the base of the river Kaldrassen.
Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


If your comment doesn't show up right away, send us email and we'll dredge it out of the spam filter.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.