Gothenburg Arrival


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Gothenburg is the second-largest city in Sweden and has been an important ice-free port since its founding in 1621. Today the city of nearly a half-million is the largest port in the Nordic countries, supports two universities, is the world-wide headquarters of the car manufacturer Volvo and the bearing and seal producer SKF, and is one of the three world-wide R&D sites for British pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. The city also is known for its many museums, pubs, and cafes.

The city’s charter included two official names, the Swedish Göteborg and the English/German Gothenburg, a common practice in Europe at the time. Because Göteborg is fairly difficult to pronounce for non-Swedish speakers, the English/German version has endured and Gothenburg remains one of the few Swedish localities with two names.

We spent our first three days in Gothenburg finally resolving a water leak that has persisted since we left Stockholm and enjoying some of the city’s restaurants, then visited the excellent Volvo Museum that covers the company’s history from its start in 1927 to present day.

Below are trip highlights from August 28th through 30th in Gothenburg, Sweden. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

8/28/2019
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Current
The Gota Alv river current is running about a half-knot with us. We’re doing 8.6 knots when at 1839 RPM we’d typically be doing closer to 8 knots.
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Waiting
Tied off to a siding to wait about 30 minutes for the Marieholms rail bridge to open. They need a gap in the scheduled traffic.
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Marieholms Bridge
Passing through the Marieholms railway bridge.
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Approaching Gothenburg
Approaching Gothenburg. We’ll be mooring just beyond the prominent white and red building.
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Gota Alv Bridge
Passing under the Gota Alv Bridge.
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Goteborgs Gasthamn
Dirona moored at Goteborgs Gasthamn with the bow facing up-river.
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Water Leak
We have been finding large amounts of water on top of the freshwater tank where we store supplies. When we first found it, there there was evidence of the shower drain leaking. We fixed that and leak-tested it carefully so put it all back together. A week or so later, there water on top of the tank again. We’re pretty sure the shower was leaking but it’s definitely not now.

We chased this for a while before finding that it’s coming from the master stateroom air conditioning unit. Normally these leaks are easy to find. If water accumulates in the tank, it’s easy to see and clearing the drain will fix the problem.

In this case the drain is clear and the condensation is draining properly. What we didn’t see was at the back there is an area where dust has accumulated and formed a damn that just includes a small part of the tank below it. Just this section is dropping condensation below. It’s a difficult to get to area only accessible when everything is removed behind the head. From there a panel can be removed and the leak can be seen. Not super hard to fix but quite hard to find.

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Sunset
Fabulous sunset over Gothenburg.
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Viking
The 387 ft (118 m) barque Viking, built in 1907, is believe to be the largest sailing ship ever built in Scandinavia. The ship is now permanently moored along the Gothenburg waterfront and is a 3-star hotel,
8/29/2019
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Cleaning HVAC Unit
Here we have the master stateroom HVAC unit detached from the floor and lifted so we can clean it thoroughly and dry the sound insulation below where water has been leaking. The leak was due to accumulated condensation-soaked dust that made a path for a portion of the condenser run-off to run down the outside of the drain pan. James is visible on the other side, where we have the panel underneath the head sink off to access the back of the HVAC unit. This was a time-consuming fix but we can’t complain too much in that in 10 years of use, this is only the 2nd leak problem we have had to chase down.
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Rix Crystal
The Gota Alv bridge open for the cargo ship Rix Crystal to pass.
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Clearing Vent
When filling the fresh water tank, we noticed there was pressure in the tank and the vent was plugged. Here James is removing the vent from where it connects to the tank so he can check the vent is clear both from the hose to the vent vent but also from the fitting to the tank.
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Americas Cup
Across the river from where we were moored in Gothenburg, we could see several Team Oracle America’s Cup containers probably from the last races in Bermuda. We don’t know the story of how they got here.
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Trimaran
An interesting boat design on this trimaran. In an effort to get the speed advantages of a multi-hull without paying the normal width penalty, this boat has hinges that allow the two outer hulls to be folded back up against the main full. This allows the trimaran to fit in a monohull slip but, once it leaves, it can open back up and travel as a trimaran.
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Pinchos
A delicious and fun meal at Pinchos Tapas restaurant. The establishment has no printed menus—patrons download their app and order directly from it, entering their table number. Customers are notified through the app when food or drinks are ready to pick-up. The tapas are served on wooden planks that fit double-deckered on holders built into the tables. It’s a casual and fun place to eat, with good food.
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Sunset
The days are getting shorter and we’re seeing a lot more sunsets now.
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Goteborgs Gasthamn
Looking east across Goteborgs Gasthamn towards downtown Gothenburg.
8/30/2019
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Volvo Museum
Volvo is headquartered in Gothenburg and the Volvo Museum there covers the company’s history from its start in 1927 to present day.
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Volvo 1800 S
The Volvo 1800 S was made famous as the car Roger Moore drove in the TV series The Saint.
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1933 Volvos
Volvo PV655 and and PV654 from 1933 with some other historic Volvos.
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High-Speed Volvos
Volvo isn’t just about sedate and safe road cars. The company also produces jet engines and Volvos are actively raced. The 37 Viggen fighter, equipped with a Volvo RM8B engine, was one of the most powerful fighters of its time.
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Volvo D16
The Volvo D16 Euro 6 is a 16.1 liter engine able to reliably produce 550 hp up to 750 hp in different configurations all with a torque of 3,550 Nm (2618 ft lbs). The engine meets the modern Euro 6 emission regulations using Diesel Particulate Filter and Selective Catalytic Reduction. We’re not sure what we would do with a 16.1 liter diesel engine but we know we want one. :-)
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Volvo B10M
A 1979 Volvo B10M bus chassis that was built from 1966 through 2000. This is what a bus looks like prior to the body being installed and many bus builders like Scania, Mercedes, and Volvo sell chassis with all mechanical components installed like this one to bus coach builders like Setra that build finished buses. This puts the major bus manufacturers in the position of both producing finished buses and providing chassis to competing bus manufacturers. The upside is it allows them to target more markets and gives them more opportunities to be the bus manufacturer that a given customer chooses.

The B10M sold 51,492 buses during its 35 years of production. The particular configuration has the engine mounted centrally rather than at the rear of the bus which is more common in highway buses. Mounting the engine centrally requires that the inline 6 cylinder engine be leaned over 90 degrees to fit between the interior floor and the bottom of the bus. Having the engine lying on it’s side allows the engine to be centrally located but leaves the bus interior space unchanged.

One applications of this chassis was a double articulating design from Volvo Metrobus that seats a surprisingly large 270 passengers. Because the oil pan is no longer the lowest point of the engine in these central engine bus designs, they have to run dry sump oiling systems where the oil is pumped out of the engine during operation to a separate reservoir and then pumped from the reservoir into the pressure oil system. Dry sump oiling is also common in race cars where they want to mount the mass of the engine as low as possible and they don’t want high-g acceleration to cause oil starvation as the oil moves around in the oil pan. Putting an inline 6-cylinder engine on its side is a nice solution for the central engine layout common in articulating city buses and many passenger trains.

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Port Arthur
A good dinner in a great environment at Port Arthur on the island of Hisingen. The neighbourhood pub was established in 1918 when the area was a shipyard and is the oldest seaman’s pub in Gothenburg.
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Chalmers
Striking modern buildings at the Chalmers Lindholmen University College, a campus of the Gothenburg-based Chalmers University of Technology. We’ll be taking a ferry back to Dirona from here.
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Juno
The Gothenburg-based cruise boats Juno and Wilhelm Tam that we saw along the Gota Canal, viewed from our ferry back to Dirona.
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Dirona
Dirona moored at Goteborgs Gasthamn, viewed from the ferry from Hisingen.
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Opera House
The modern Gothenburg Opera House, completed in 1994, stands adjacent to Goteborgs Gasthamn.
Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


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2 comments on “Gothenburg Arrival
  1. John S. says:

    Informative and interesting post as usual. I’m such a Luddite I am amazed at the Pinchos restaurant where you have to download their APP and order from it giving your table number. Perhaps too high-tech for me! Does the restaurant take that old-fashioned payment system called cash?

    • It sounds like a hassle and I suppose the install of the app seems a bit heavy weight at first. But I got to like being able to order anything anytime without having to attract the attention of the staff. If you pay by card, there is no reason to even see anyone else. It’s kind of nice to pay when you feel like it and just leave. But, I’m pretty sure you can pay the staff directly as well if you prefer. We have been to restaurants that don’t accept anything other than credit or debit cards though.

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