Cliffs of Moher


Click for larger image

The spectacular Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland’s most well-known features and popular tourist destinations. The cliffs extend for five miles, rising over 600ft from the water surface at their highest point. More than a million people visit the cliffs each year, but relatively few have an opportunity to view them from the water. On a 100-mile run from Valentia Island to the Aran Islands, we got a close-up view of the famous Cliffs of Moher and several equally striking coastal features en-route.

Trip highlights June 24th follow. Click any image for a larger view, or click the position to view the location on a map. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at http://mvdirona.com/maps

Click for larger image
Inishnabro

We woke up at the Valentia Island anchorage to a thick fog and almost skipped the Blasket Islands on our way north as we didn’t expect to see much. But even in such poor visibility, the formations off Inishnabro Island were spectacular.
Click for larger image
Seascape

Looking back through multiple sea arches and castellated cliffs at the north end of Inishnabro Island. The fog actually added to the drama of the scene.
Click for larger image
Tearaght Lighthouse

The fog slowly lifted as we continued through the island group and we could just make out the lighthouse perched on the top of Tearaght Island. It sure takes some impressive engineering to build lighthouses on these remote and rugged islands.
Click for larger image
Stairs

Below the lighthouse are several buildings and stairs leading down to a landing near the water.
Click for larger image
Tunnel

As we continue west along Tearaght Island, perhaps the most dramatic feature of the island came into view: a tunnel all the way through to the other side.
Click for larger image
Hazards

Rocks like these lurk just below the surface, so care is required when navigating the area.
Click for larger image
Tunnel from North

Looking south through the tunnel on Tearaght Island.
Click for larger image
Landing

Just off the tunnel on the right is another landing for the lighthouse. Both landings look like they’d be pretty challenging in even the smallest swell.
Click for larger image
Inishtooskert

The fog kept lifting and we got a great view to the sheer cliffs along the north shore of Inishtooskert Island.
Click for larger image
Slope

A grassy green slope behind the cliffs on Inishtooskert Island.
Click for larger image
Sheep

We were surprised to see sheep grazing on Inishtooskert Island. The island once was inhabited and now mainly sheep and seabirds live here, in particular the largest colony of European storm-petrels in Ireland.
Click for larger image
Loop Head

Ireland has no shortage of lighthouses on dramatic seascapes. This is Dermot and Grania’s Rock standing just offshore from Loop Head. A light has been lit on Loop Head since 1670. The current building was completed in 1854 and the light was automated in 1991.
Click for larger image
Three Sisters

The Three Sisters cliffs just north of Sybil Point have surprisingly similar sheer slopes and cliff-top formations.
Click for larger image
Approaching Cliffs of Moher

We’re nearing the Cliffs of Moher, one of Ireland’s most well-known coastal features. We’ve been looking forward to seeing them from the water for a while.
Click for larger image
Hags Head Signal Tower

The Hags Head signal tower, one of the 81 signal towers built along the Irish coast during the Napoleonic era. What looks like a small tower slightly lower on the point is a circular rock formation.
Click for larger image
Cliffs of Moher

The 600ft sheer Cliffs of Moher stretching out for five miles before us. Capturing their size and scale in a photograph is a real challenge.
Click for larger image
People

The Cliffs of Moher are a popular tourist destination—many people were out taking in the view. We wondered if the person near the tip of the overhand knew how far out they were.
Click for larger image
Cliffs

The cliffs were fabulous—we felt very lucky to have such calm conditions where we could approach reasonably closely. The small specks of people at the top of the cliffs give an idea of the scale.
Click for larger image
Branaunmore Sea Stack

Looking south past Branaunmore Sea Stack to the Cliffs of Moher, with O’Briens Tower at the top of the cliffs. Sir Cornelius O`Brien built the tower in 1835 as a tourist observation platform.
Click for larger image
Fardurris Point Light

The Fardurris Point Light on Innisheer Island in the Aran Islands.
Click for larger image
MV Plassy

The MV Plassy was a steam-trawler launched in 1940. In 1960, the ship went aground in a severe storm on Finnis Rock off Inisheer Island and the entire crew was rescued with a breeches buoy. A few weeks later, a second storm washed the ship off the rock and onto Inisheer Island and features in the opening credits of the British television show Father Ted.
Click for larger image
Straw Island Light

The Straw Island Lighthouse at the entrance to Killeany Bay on Inishmore Island in the Aran Islands.

Show locations on map Click the travel log icon on the left to see these locations on a map, with the complete log of our cruise.

On the map page, clicking on a camera or text icon will display a picture and/or log entry for that location, and clicking on the smaller icons along the route will display latitude, longitude and other navigation data for that location. And a live map of our current route and most recent log entries always is available at http://mvdirona.com/maps.

 
 


If your comment doesn't show up right away, send us email and we'll dredge it out of the spam filter.


One comment on “Cliffs of Moher
  1. Ron says:

    Great photos! My daughter nearly gave me a heart attack at the top of the Cliffs of Moher a couple summers back — she was being perfectly responsible, but I am freaked out by any cliffs edge.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *